News round-up: Apple says, 'hey, you can't use that logo' (and more

Since Steve and I can’t cover everything, at the end of each week day, we’ll offer this wrap-up of news items you should check out.

Apple is reportedly fighting the logo for a new German bike path, arguing that it bears too much similarity to its own. The logo for the "Apfelroute" — Apple Route — was registered with the German Patent and Trademark Office in 2018. It’s show below. What do you think?

Apple Route.png

Mosyle, an Apple mobile device management (MDM) software company, has unveiled new identity management solutions: Single Sign-On and Mosyle Auth. Available now in public beta, these new services enable enterprises and K-12 institutions to utilize Mosyle's platform in providing a more simple,  sophisticated and full-featured end-user experience, according to CEO Alcyr Arajuo.

As pointed out by Axios,  Qualcomm will receive $4.5 to $4.7 billion from its lawsuit settlement with Apple. This iincludes a "cash payment from Apple and the release of related liabilities." 

Nextiva, a cloud communications company, announced that it has named Marc Stoll as president and chief operating officer, responsible for leading Nextiva's global operations in support of its rapid growth. He has more than 20 years of experience in leading technology companies like Apple, CA, Compaq, and most recently, Anaplan.

Netflix says it’s taken sound quality to “another level” for viewers. With this update, Netflix says that users will get to experience audio quality that is “closer to what creators hear in the studio.”

As noted by AppleInsider, Apple has updated its list of “vintage and obsolete products” with the addition of the iPad 2, the last device that Steve Jobs launched at an Apple event.

Apple Pay is "coming soon" to The Netherlands, according to the Dutch bank ING. Apple suppler Foxconn is beefing up its investment in microLED display tech to secure orders from Apple for future iPhones, according to a report from the Chinese-language Economic Daily News (as noted by DigiTimes). 

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) claims that US border officials are abusing the powers granted to them to search smartphones and laptops.