News round-up: First U.S. jury trial in Apple-Qualcomm started today (and more news)

Since Steve and I can’t cover everything, at the end of each week day, we’ll offer this wrap-up of news items you should check out. 

Will this never end? The first U.S. trial in the ongoing Apple-Qualcomm battle started today. This legal brouhaha over alleged patent violations has been ongoing since July 2017.

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According to AppleInsider, German teenager Linus Henze has sent Apple full details of a Keychain security exploit that he demonstrated in early February, and has done so despite the company ignoring his previous conditions. Henze says that he has decided to reveal the details to Apple because the bug he's found "is very critical and because the security of macOS users is important to me.”

Today, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) approved WebAuthn, a new authentication standard that aims to replace the password as a way of securing your online accounts. First announced last year, WebAuthn (which stands for Web Authentication) is already supported by most browsers, including Safari. Its publication as an official web standard should pave the way for wider adoption by individual websites.

MacGamer HQ is asking for help by running their free Heaven benchmark tool and helping them create the ultimate “Can I run it for Mac tool” ever. See more details here.

The New York Post claims Apple’s push into Hollywood is off to a rough start — thanks in part to “intrusive” tech executives, including CEO Tim Cook.

Cult of Mac reports on a tweet from writer Max Weinbach that says the upcoming AirPod 2s could be fully charged in 15 minutes. However, their case will be bigger and heavier.

Apple has released the fourth developer beta versions of iOS 12.2, tvOS 12.2, watchOS 5.2, and macOS 10.14.4.  Registered developers can download the betas via Apple’s developer portal. Or they can be downloaded over-the-air once the proper configuration profile has been installed from the Developer Center. 

House Democrats will introduce a bill this Wednesday called Save the Internet Act in a bid to restore net neutrality rules, via Gizmodo.