U.S. government can’t help in Apple’s court fight against the EU’s order to pay back taxes

The U.S. government can’t help in Apple’s court fight against the European Union’s order to pay Ireland a record 13 billion euros (about $15.3 billion) in unpaid taxes.

The EU’s highest court rejected the U.S. request, its press service said on Twitter — as noted by Bloomberg — today. A lower court in December also dismissed the request, saying the American government failed to show it had a direct interest in the result of the state-aid case.

In 2016 the EU ruled that Apple must repay 13 billion euros in back taxes dating back to 2003-2014. Europe’s anti-trust and consumer investigation agency claimed that Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands have attracted investment and jobs by helping big companies avoid tax in other countries, including EU members. Ireland Finance Minister Noonan has said the country "disagrees profoundly" with the back tax ruling by the European Commission. 

Also, Tim Cook has branded the European Commission ruling “total political crap.” Apple’s CEO suggested the "retroactive" tax bill was an attempt by the EU to grab taxes owed to the U.S. treasury and harmonize tax rates across the 28-nation bloc.