11% of active smartphones globally will be compatible with Apple Pay by year’s end

According to new analysis from the IHS Markit research firm, 3.4 billion smartphones will be ready for Apple Pay, Samsung Pay and Android Pay by the end of 2017, and the number is expected to increase to 5.3 billion by 2021.

IHS Markit estimates that by the end of the 2017, 11% of active smartphones globally will be compatible with Apple Pay; 61%with Android Pay; and 3% with Samsung Pay, which overlaps with Android Pay, as Android Pay is also available on Samsung smartphones. 

“To reach these smartphones, Apple, Samsung and Android must strategically expand mobile payments services and build partnerships with banks and financial institutions,” says Ruomeng Wang, Mobile & Telecoms analyst at IHS Markit. 

By the end of the first quarter of 2017, Apple had launched Apply Pay in 15 international markets; Samsung had rolled out Samsung Pay in 14 markets; and Android Pay was available in 10 markets. 

“Apple and Samsung are leading the global expansion of device-based mobile payments services, Wang says. “Despite Apple Pay having a 10-month head start on Samsung Pay, Samsung has been catching up with Apple in terms of total available markets.”

Apple and Google are working to make their mobile payments services the default payment method, tied to their own ecosystems and used across platforms. Currently there are 38 payments platforms and two million small businesses supporting Apple Pay on the web, which allows users to checkout online using an Apple device and Safari browser. Apple Pay also is available at the App Store, and integrates with apps such as Uber, AirBnB, Lyft, Groupon, Instacart, OpenTable and Starbucks. 

Android Pay enables users to make payments in Google Play, in apps and on mobile web sites such as Domino’s, Dunkin Donuts and Etsy in the U.S., and subscribe to the Washington Post through Android Pay at a discount.

In South Korea, Samsung is working with local online shopping platforms to launch Samsung Pay Shopping. In March 2017, the company partnered with Visa Checkout to expand Samsung Pay’s reach outside South Korea. 

“Compared to Apple and Google, Samsung doesn’t have the same level of content, app platforms or web browsers designed to keep customers engaged. In order to tie customers to Samsung’s ecosystem, Samsung must actively expand Samsung Pay’s support for online retail,” Wang says.