Apple is ‘committed to Ireland’ whatever the outcome of the EU tax investigation

Apple is "committed to Ireland," whatever might happen in an European Commission investigation into Irish tax deals, company vice president Cathy Kearney (pictured) said. She added that the company isn’t getting unfair state aid but will remain “committed to Ireland” whatever the outcome of the EU case.

“We feel that we’ve paid every cent of tax that is due in Ireland,” Kearney, the company's top lieutenant in Ireland, said at the European Parliament in Brussels, as reported by Bloomberg. “We don’t feel that there has been state aid involved and I suppose we look forward to that outcome happening at the end of the day and being vindicated in that way. I would say that the Irish government also agrees with that view.”

Apple, Google, and other companies will be asked about their European tax deals on Wednesday as European Union (EU) lawmakers up the pressure on multinationals to pay more tax on their profits locally. The EU has already ordered Dutch authorities to recover up to 30 million euros (about US$32.23 million) from U.S. coffee chain Starbucks and Luxembourg to do the same with Fiat Chrysler for their tax deals. 

Europe’s anti-trust and consumer investigation agency has claimed that Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands have attracted investment and jobs by helping big companies avoid tax in other countries, including EU members. For example, the EU feels Ireland was too lenient in rulings it gave to Apple and which helped the company shield tens of billions of dollars in profit from taxation.

For example, the EU feels Ireland was too lenient in rulings it gave to Apple and which helped the company shield tens of billions of dollars in profit from taxation. At 12.5%, Ireland’s corporate tax rate beats the U.S. rate of 35%. However, participating companies don’t pay that 12.5 % under the double Irish structure.