Government-funding planning board wants more info on Apple’s planned Irish data center

An Bord Pleanál, a government-funded planning body in Ireland wants Apple to provide a lot more information about its proposed Irish data center, according to documents obtained by Business Insider.

The Cupertino, California-based company planned to start building the €850 million data center on a 500-acre site before the end of last year, but a decision won't be made until the summer. However, the building application is being held up by the Irish government, which is currently reviewing a number of appeals that were made after Galway Council gave Apple a thumbs-up to proceed on the data center.

A COMPUTER-GENERATED IMAGE OF APPLE’S PROPOSED DATA CENTER, COURTESY OF “BUSINESS INSIDER.”

A COMPUTER-GENERATED IMAGE OF APPLE’S PROPOSED DATA CENTER, COURTESY OF “BUSINESS INSIDER.”

Complainants argued that the data centre would increase noise and light pollution, flooding, and traffic, according to Business Insider. Some also said it would act as an eyesore and others said it would harm the local badger and bat populations.

The proposed facility in County Galway, Ireland, would be shrouded by trees and power many of Apple's most important services across Europe, including the iTunes Store, the App Store, iMessage, Maps, and Siri, according to Business Insider. Apple and Arup (the firm coordinating the project) must provide additional information to An Bord Pleanála by March 7 in accordance with section 132 of the Planning and Development Act 2000. If no information is provided then the organization could dismiss the case, the article adds.