Apple accused of patent infringement involving Siri

Another day, another lawsuit. Dot 23 Technologies — a Texas-based, non-practicing entity (a patent troll, in my opinion) — is suing Apple for patent infringement, claiming that the intelligent digital assistant violates three of its patents. 

In a complaint filed with the lawsuit-friendly Eastern District Court of Texas, Dot 23 claims Apple violated its patents dubbed “Mobile Keyless Telephone Instruments and Wireless Telecommunications System Having Voice Dialing and Voice Programming Capabilities,” “Wireless Telephone System with

Programming and Information Service,” and “Wireless Prepaid Telephone System with Dispensable Instruments.”

The non-practicing entity wants acknowledgment that Apple violated its patents. And, naturally, it wants money: “all damages to which it is entitled under 35 U.S.C. § 284 resulting from Apple’s infringement, and ordering a full accounting of all damages adequate to compensate Dot 23 for the infringement of its patent rights”; pre-judgment and post-judgment interest on its damages at the maximum rate permitted by law; and award costs and attorney's fees.

So what’s a patent troll? It’s a kind of non-practicing entity, a company that doesn't produce anything or truly practice law except to sue others. Patent trolls amass large numbers of patents with the intention of launching patent infringement suits against companies and individuals that they maintain have illegally used an element of something for which they hold the patent.