With "Steve Jobs" on screens later this week, friends and family are picking sides

OCT 6 2011 - THE MORNING AFTER STEVE JOBS DEATH - PEOPLE PAY TRIBUTE OUTSIDE PALO ALTO APPLE STORE. PHOTO BY Aislinn Dewey, CC BY-SA 3.0

OCT 6 2011 - THE MORNING AFTER STEVE JOBS DEATH - PEOPLE PAY TRIBUTE OUTSIDE PALO ALTO APPLE STORE. PHOTO BY Aislinn Dewey, CC BY-SA 3.0

On October 9, the movie "Steve Jobs" -- directed by Danny Boyle and scripted by Aaron Sorkin from the biography by Walter Isaacson -- opens at theaters nationwide. With a crop of films about the Apple co-founder having been released over the past four years since Jobs' death, many have felt that the movies tend to focus on the negatives of the man rather than what he accomplished in his lifetime. Sadly, it appears that even his close friends and family can't agree on whether they like or hate the upcoming movie.

First, the Wall Street Journal is reporting that Jobs' widow, Laurene Powell Jobs, tried to block the production of the movie repeatedly, saying that the movie and others focus on Jobs as being cruel and inhumane, rather than focusing on his accomplishments. Ms. Jobs lobbied Sony Pictures Entertainment (which ended up passing on making the movie) and Universal Pictures, which will release the movie on Friday. 

Universal Pictures offered to show Ms. Jobs the movie before its release, but only with strings attached -- she would have to sign a nondisclosure agreement prohibiting her from discussing it publicly until after the film's release. She declined. 

Bill Campbell was a member of the Apple board of directors for many years and a personal friend. Although he hasn't seen the film, he expressed concern that "a whole generation is going to think of him in a different way if they see a movie that depicts him in a negative way." 

Current Apple CEO Tim Cook was also less than enthusiastic about the movie in a discussion with "The Late Show" host Stephen Colbert, to whom he commented that "I think a lot of people are trying to be opportunistic and I hate this." 

Probably nobody knew the late Apple co-founder better in the early years of the company than Steve Wozniak, who was paid $200,000 to consult on the film. Woz says that he understands that the movie doesn't portray real events, and that "It's about Jobs and his personality. I feel that it did a great job." 

When it comes to Mac system software designer Andy Hertzfeld, he told Re/code that the movie "deviates from reality everywhere -- almost nothing in it is like it really happened -- but ultimately that doesn't matter that much. The purpose of the film is to entertain, inspire and move the audience, not to portray reality. It is cavalier about the facts but aspires to export and expose the deeper truths behind Steve's unusual personality and behavior, and it often but not always succeeds at that."

On this fourth anniversary of the man's death, it appears that Steve Jobs can still stir up an emotional response in a number of people. Are you planning to see the movie this weekend? Why or why not? Leave your comments below.