Wednesday, September 28, 2022
Apple GlassesOpinionsPatents

Apple wants its Apple Glasses to be able to easily allow a user to read text in a CGR environment

This image illustrates an example of reading text in a CGR environment.

Apple has been granted a patent (number 11,367,4156) for “presenting computer-generated content associated with reading content on user interactions.” It involves allowing the rumored “Apple Glasses,” an augmented reality/virtual reality/mixed reality headset,” to be seamless in reading text in a computer-generated reality (CGR) environment.

About the patent

In the patent Apple notes that text content may be presented through a variety of mediums, including physical mediums (e.g., book, newspaper, magazine) and electronic mediums (e.g., online article, e-reader). However, the tech giant says that previously available systems do not obtain and/or present computer-generated reality (CGR) content that is associated with the text content based on how a user interacts with the text content and/or a device used to view the text content. 

For example, previously available systems don’t present CGR content based on a portion of the text content with which the user is currently engaged or in response to obtaining certain user input. Apple wants to change this with Apple Glasses.

Summary of the patent

Here’s Apple’s abstract of the patent: “In accordance with some implementations, a method is performed at an electronic device with one or more processors, a non-transitory memory, one or more input devices, and a display. The method includes displaying, on the display, a reader interface including one or more portions of reading content. The method further includes detecting, via the one or more input devices, a first positional change input. 

“The first positional change input is indicative of the electronic device changing from a first position to a second position. The method further includes, in response to detecting the first positional change input, ceasing to display the reader interface including the one or more portions of reading content, and displaying, on the display, one or more computer-generated representations corresponding to the one or more portions of reading content.”

Dennis Sellers
the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.