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Future Apple devices could have logos that change colors

Apple has been granted a patent (number 11,226,444) for an “electronic device having colored surfaces with neutral transmission.” It hints at future Apple devices with logos that could change colors.

About the patent

In the patent data, Apple says that electronic devices such as laptop computers, smartphones, smart speakers, and more could be provided with optical components. These optical components may include light sensors, displays, light-emitting diodes, and other components that emit or detect light. 

When viewed from the exterior region, the optical component covering structure may exhibit a non-neutral color (e.g., red, gold, etc.). This means that the Mac, iPhone, iPad, HomePod mini, etc., could be provided with “a desired appearance” for a specific user.

Summary of the patent

Here’s Apple’s abstract of the patent: “An electronic device may be provided with input-output devices and other components such as optical components that emit light and optical components that detect light. An optical component covering structure may be interposed between an interior region of the electronic device and an exterior region that surrounds the electronic device. 

“The optical components may be formed in the interior region of the electronic device. The optical component covering structure may overlap the optical components. The optical component covering structure may be configured to exhibit a flat visible light transmission spectrum. This neutral light transmission characteristic allows the overlapped optical components to emit and/or receive light through the optical component covering structure without imposing an undesired color cast. 

“The optical component covering structure may include first and second layers with complementary light transmission characteristics. When viewed from the exterior region, the optical component covering structure may exhibit a non-neutral color.”

the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.
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