Thursday, January 20, 2022
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Synology unveils 12-Bay tower storage units: the DS3622xs+ and
DS2422+

Synology has announced its newest 12-bay NAS units: the Synology DiskStation DS3622xs+ and DS2422+, as well as the DX1222 companion expansion unit. T

The DS2422+ (pictured) offers reliable mass storage and efficient data protection for a wide range of scenarios, according to Peggy Weng, product manager at Synology. Expandable to 24 bays, the DS2422+ is designed for serving and protecting large data sets in multi-user environments. Weng says that dependable 2,200/1,300 MB/s sequential read/write speeds, plenty of storage options, and cost-effective deployment make it an ideal choice for small and medium-sized businesses looking to manage and back up their data assets more productively.

A step up in capabilities, the DS3622xs+ boasts processing and ample built-in connectivity to support heavy duty applications, including network surveillance, backup server, storage for virtual machines, and direct video editing. The high-performance unit delivers over 260,000 4K random read IOPS and 4,700/2,400 MB/s sequential read/write speeds.
Equipped with dual 10GbE RJ-45 ports and three Gigabit ports, the DS3622xs+delivers fast networking and out-of-band management (OOB) right out of the box while supporting integration with Fibre Channel SAN according to Michael Wang, product manager at Synology. The DS2422+ integrates with existing IT infrastructure thanks to four Gigabit RJ-45 ports. 

Both units allow for expansion with 10/25GbE network interface cards.NVMe SSD cache can added through M.2 NVMe SSD adapter cards to boost random I/O performance for hot data. Combination cards allow 10GbE connectivity and SSD cache to be added through a single PCIe 3.0 slot.

The DS3622xs+ and DS2422+ are both built for DSM 7.0, the latest version of Synology’s DiskStation Manager (DSM) operating system, with more powerful data and storage management tools.

Both the DS3622xs+ and DS2422+ are designed to optimally work with Synology enterprise drives. The HAT5300 3.5″ SATA HDD and SAT5200 2.5″ SATA SSD are engineered specially to provide class-leading performance and DSM integration for enhanced monitoring and maintenance capabilities, according to Wang. Storage capacity can be doubled or tripled by connecting up to two 12-bay DX1222 expansion units. Managing storage expansion is done via Synology DSM.

Synology also recently announced the availability of C2 Transfer for Business and C2 Backup for Business. Synology C2 Backup for Business is a cloud-based solution for businesses to back up Windows devices and Microsoft 365 data directly to Synology C2. C2 Backup for Business supports bare-metal backup for your Windows devices that includes Windows PCs and servers, Windows 7 SP1, Windows 10, Windows 11,Windows Server 2008 R2SP1, 2012, 2016, and 2019. It also enables users to protect Microsoft 365 essential services including Exchange mail service, where users can access and restore data if there is a breach or technical difficulties.

C2 Transfer for Business, is a business cloud solution that ensures teams and organizations sending vital and sensitive files to clients are secure and delivered safely. In addition to having end-to-end encryption, user identity authentication, image watermarks, link expiry dates, and download limits of C2 Transfer, C2 Transfer forBusiness offers a simple interface with management tools that provide greater controlover how multiple users transfer files and send requests. The license management features also allow administrators to enable or disable access.

The DS2422+, DS3622xs+, and DX1221 are now available from Synology resellers and partners. A 90-day free trial of C2 Backup for Business is available without a credit card. 

The C2 Transfer for Business’ pricing plans are available at $49.99 per month, or $499.99 per year, for five users. Should users decide to expand, the pricing is $6.99 per month or $69.99 per year for every additional user.

Dennis Sellers
the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.