Thursday, December 9, 2021
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Apple wants its Maps app to offer better venue support

Airports, shopping centers, and more are targeted

Apple Maps Look Insider

Apple has been granted a patent (number 11,029,173) for a “venues map application and system.” The goal is for the Maps app to be more effective at guiding uses around shopping centers, airports, etc.

The problem with some Maps apps

Maps apps allow a user to search for a place or address and obtain driving directions to one or more search results. However, Apple says that such apps don’t provide an inside view of a venue or the type of and/or layout of points of interest within the venue. 

Apple’s solution to venue mapping issues

An inside view of the venue could aid the user in determining if the venue is really where the user wants to go. Or it could help determine if there’s another venue is available to meet the user’s needs. Apple says there’s a need and desire for a map application that provides an inside view of a venue located and/or identified by the map application. 

Apple also says there’s a need for a map app that presents the inside view of venue in a manner that is easy for the user to search for and identify and navigate to points of interest within the venue. The tech giant says an inside view of the map application should also be accessible by other applications and programs on the user’s device to enhance the user’s experience with those applications and programs. 

The summary of the patent

Here’s the summary of the patent: “In some implementations, a computing device can provide a map application providing a representation of a physical structure of venues (e.g., shopping centers, airports) identified by the application. In addition, the application can provide an inside view that includes the physical layout and geometry of the venue’s structure as well as the location, structure and layout of points of interest (e.g., stores, security check points, restrooms) within the venue. The views become more detailed as the user zooms into the venue to reveal points of interest and to give the user a feel for traversing the venue.”

the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.

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