Here are the latest developments in Apple vs. Caltech, Apple vs. Dot 23

Apple has reportedly filed counterclaims against the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), blasting the latter's Wi-Fi patent lawsuit on several grounds.

Apple asserts that Caltech didn't file its lawsuit until May 26 this year, over six years after the 802.11n standard was published and hence too late to collect damages, according to MacRumors. Caltech also allegedly failed to disclose prior art for its patents, with Apple arguing that RA codes were well-established prior to IRA.

In May Caltech accused Apple of selling various iPhone, iPad, Mac, and Apple Watch models, along with other Wi-Fi products, that incorporate IRA/LDPC encoders and/or decoders and allegedly infringe on its patents. The university is seeking monetary damages. 

In 2015 Caltech sued Canon, Nikon and 4 other digital-camera makers, for infringing on six patents relating to pixel sensors in digital cameras. All of the patents came after research the university was doing for NASA. 

In another lawsuit, Dot 23 has filed to dismiss its case against Apple, saying it's settled out of court, according to AppleInsider. The terms of the agreement — including amounts owed — have not been made public.

Dot 23 Technologies — a Texas-based, non-practicing entity (a patent troll, in my opinion) — sued Apple in January for patent infringement, claiming that the intelligent digital assistant violates three of its patents. 

In a complaint filed with the lawsuit-friendly Eastern District Court of Texas, Dot 23 claims Apple violated its patents dubbed “Mobile Keyless Telephone Instruments and Wireless Telecommunications System Having Voice Dialing and Voice Programming Capabilities,” “Wireless Telephone System with Programming and Information Service,” and “Wireless Prepaid Telephone System with Dispensable Instruments.”