SuperSync is a fine tool for managing iTunes on a Mac

SuperSync is an excellent Mac OS X (10.5 and later) tool for many things, including managing iTunes. With it, you can retrieve a song from a laptop, play or download a song from a home computer while at the office, upload a new album from the road, or back-up an entire music library on a new computer or network drive.

SuperSync allows visual comparison of two music libraries locally or over the net. With this feature, you can see what music is located in each library. You can select the tracks you want copied from one library to the other, and click Synchronize to begin one or two-way file synchronization.

SuperSync includes integration with iTunes so that any additions to the SuperSync music library can be automatically reflected in iTunes. SuperSync eliminates the need to manually add new music or remove broken links in iTunes. Also, the software includes a beefy library scanner that will clean up your SuperSync and iTunes music libraries, removing broken links to music and adding new tracks.

I use SuperSync to keep the tunes between my desktop and laptops in sync. All your music, movies, and playlists can be moved to all the computers you keep music on. At the Sellers household, we also use it to sync music between our various computers to create a master library.

SuperSync is a breeze to install and set-up. After I download it, I had it up and running on two computers (a 27-inch iMac and a 12-inch MacBook) in less than 10 minutes. However, it will take a bit longer to delve into all the power user features the software offers.

For example, you can compare and merge any two music libraries. You can export all or a subset of your library as a directory of tracks. You can locate and fix iTunes library problems, such as locating corrupt files, deleting duplicates and finding missing tracks.

With SuperSync, you can import media from a hard drive or network drive. Plus, you can access your home music library from just about anywhere and share a common library with several iTunes users on a network drive. You can even see and play files from your iPod or iPhone.

As I said, getting up and going for relatively simply syncing is easy. However, SuperSync does have lots of options, and you'll need to spend some time in the app to understand how to tap its full potential. But once you do, you'll be impressed with how much you can accomplish (though I do wish there was a way to "invert" the Artist and Album filtering).

SupersSync costs $22.95 for a two-machine license. Family licenses are available for $29.95 per five-pack, and $39.95 per 10-pack. A demo is available for download.