Apple’s planned Irish data center may be delayed

Apple's first data center in Ireland is facing delays after unhappy Irish citizens lodged formal complaints with the Irish government, reports Business Insider.

The Cupertino, California-based company planned to start building the €850 million data center on a 500-acre site before the end of last year, but a decision won't be made until the summer, a local councillor told the publication. 

The application is being held up by the Irish government, which is currently reviewing a number of appeals that were made after Galway Council granted Apple planning permission to build a data center.

A computer-generated image of Apple’s proposed data center, courtesy of “Business Insider.”

A computer-generated image of Apple’s proposed data center, courtesy of “Business Insider.”

Business Insider reports that it’s visited the site and found that the vast majority of locals were in favor of Apple's data centre, which could create up to 300 jobs in the area, initially for construction workers but ultimately for IT professionals. However, between 20 and 25 complaints were made to Galway Council by local residents and other Irish citizens when Apple's plans were made public. 

Complainants argued that the data centre would increase noise and light pollution, flooding, and traffic, according to Business Insider. Some also said it would act as an eyesore and others said it would harm the local badger and bat populations.

In February 2015 Apple announced its plans to build its first two data centers in Europe to host iCloud, iTunes and other online services. Located in Ireland and Denmark, these facilities will be powered by 100% renewable energy.

“We are grateful for Apple’s continued success in Europe and proud that our investment supports communities across the continent,” said CEO Tim Cook at the time. “This significant new investment represents Apple’s biggest project in Europe to date. We’re thrilled to be expanding our operations, creating hundreds of local jobs and introducing some of our most advanced green building designs yet.”